Paul Leslie’s 2013 Outlook: Uncertainty, but Opportunity

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Paul Leslie, CEO of Dovel Technologies

WashingtonExec 2013 Government Contracting Outlook Series:

The new year brings big changes for the Federal IT industry, and WashingtonExec is back with its Government Contracting Industry Outlook Series.

We are giving local executives the opportunity to share their thoughts on where they see our industry headed this year and beyond. Leaders were asked a series of questions focused on cloud computing, healthcare IT, defense, mobility, and more.

Paul Leslie, CEO of Dovel Technologies, spoke with us about his predictions for 2013:

“I think it is very clear. Predicting on-going market uncertainty, continued focus on low price technically compliant procurements, IT services bids becoming commodity buys, more firm fixed price contract awards, program funding pressures, corporate profit pressures, and the unilateral need for contractors to manage program performance risk – is a no-brainer.  Given the midnight hour shenanigans on the Hill last month, and the potential collision in late March with CR expiration, sequestration deadline, and expiration of the debt ceiling, businesses will hold tight their 2013 budgets on investments and hirings.

However, with uncertainty comes opportunity.  My prediction is 2013 will be positively favorable for Small Businesses that have strong differentiated capabilities.  What’s the key component?  Innovation!  Government agencies need to modernize their legacy systems and reset their enterprise platforms regardless of budget and downsizing pressures.  Small businesses that can provide government customers with high quality and innovative solutions while effectively reducing long-term enterprise costs and resources will reap the benefits from these opportunities.

Success will be enjoyed by those small business innovators who are responsive, agile, flexible, and focused on customers “real” needs – but it will come at a cost to current incumbents and bureaucratic-siloed organizations as they are perceived to be non-responsive and inflexible.”

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